Guitar lessons in Edinburgh

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Welcome to the guitar lessons in Edinburgh blog! Here we've got some lesson material mixed in with some musings on learning music in general. Feel free to join in!

 

By Guitar lessons in Edinburgh, Apr 20 2018 11:28PM

Following on from the previous blog post, if we take jazz, possibly the least popular genre ever, Guitar lessons in edinburgh would propose it to be a perfect marriage of the requirements of both classical and rock. Which means you have to practice twice as much! Let's take one of the most prominent blues/rock guitarists (the subject of a recent blog post...) of recent years: Joe Bonamassa. Now, to get to the top of the blues rock mountain Bonamassa claims to have practiced around 4 or 5 hours a day from the age of a young boy (he was actually touring with BB King when he was 12!). Not everyone starts this young for sure, so overall he's getting in more hours than most. However let's take the 'head' of the jazz genre: Pat Metheny. He states that he practiced around 12-13 hours a day. It's obviously not a simple equation like this, but the requirements are fuller. One of the great things about studying jazz (and this is what makes it a great subject for any guitar teacher in Edinburgh to focus on), even if you didn't necessarily have desires to play it, is that being a competent jazz player requires you to have as much musical material under your fingers as possible. This means scales, arpeggios, intervals, chords. And it means in as many patterns as possible, in every key and (on the guitar) in every position. Even just from a technical point of view, this means that from your jazz practice you'll get really good at playing scales, arpeggios, intervals etc., basically all the foundational material that makes up music. Because jazz is all built around a tight rhythm, you have to be able to play everything in time, and as anyone who thinks they've learnt a piece of music then tried to play it in time knows, the difference is night and day. The argument continues, but until then, go out and study your jazz!

By Guitar lessons in Edinburgh, Jan 31 2017 03:00AM

Where is your guitar right now? In your hands?? No-one practices as much as they think they should and it's easy to get frustrated if you feel you don't have the time to spare. Finding a guitar teacher in Edinburgh is a good start as it means you've at least got an incentive to learn the material before the next lesson. At Guitar lessons in Edinburgh emphasis is given to the importance of practicing the right way. Play things slowly and don't get frustrated; if you practice slowly and carefully for 15 minutes, even if you can't hear any difference then you will still have gotten 15 minutes better at guitar. Do that everyday and over time you are gauranteed to improve, the only way to fasttrack it is to spend more time practicing. This sounds obvious, but what 99% of guitar players do is try and play everything they learn perfectly at full speed the first time they try it, which always has either 2 results: A. you can play it perfectly at full speed first time, which means it wasn't challenging enough for you to begin with, or B: you play it badly and then continually get frustrated that you can't play it and you're not improving, which results in a rut that many of us have found ourselves in. A great principle to practice by is: everything you play, you have to play perfectly every time. Now that sounds like a tall order, but if you allow yourself to slow it down and slow it down until that's achievable (and there is NO limit on how slow it might have to be) then it's really not hard at all, and it never should. Practice should NEVER be hard, though it might take a lot of time. Remember that every time you make a mistake, whether it's playing out of time, playing the wrong note, not giving each note it's full value, whatever, then you are learning that mistake, and all that achieves is making that whole process much longer and more frustrating. So try it, whatever tune you're working on, be honest with yourself and slow it down till it's perfect, practice it for a while and I gauruntee when you speed it back up you will have made serious progress from where you were before. Unless you're doing this already in which case, congratulations! You're probably already great, keep up the good work!


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